Who does Mama give the quilt?

Mama, the narrator, ultimately gives the family quilts to Maggie instead of Dee (Wangero) because she recognizes that Dee gets everything she wants, that she’s even already claimed the quilts as her own, because they were promised to Maggie, and because Maggie is the daughter who wants them for the…

Why did Mama give Maggie the quilts?

When Mama gives the quilts the Maggie, she ensures that the family heritage will stay alive in the manner she prefers. By using the quilts and making her own when they wear out, Maggie will add to the family’s legacy, rather than distancing herself from it.

What will Maggie do with a quilt her mother gives her?

Maggie’s attachment to the quilts is not determined by their economic value. Dee would merely hang the quilts, putting them on display and thereby making them part of her own self-display. Maggie would value the quilts for themselves, not for how they would make her appear to others.

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Who should get the quilt in everyday use?

At the end of “Everyday Use,” Maggie gets the quilts. Initially, Mama intended to give one of the quilts to Dee; however, when Dee left for school she turned the quilt down because she was not interested in hanging on to any memory of her family’s hard-working, lower-class lifestyle.

Who gets the quilts at the end of the story?

Who gets the quilts at the end of the story? At the end of the story, the mother “snatched the quilts out of Mrs. Wangero’s hands and dumped them into Maggie’s lap” (8). Thus, Maggie got to keep the quilts.

Does Mama regret giving Maggie the quilts?

By giving the quilts to Maggie, Mama in a sense merely fulfills her promise. Mama had previously offered Dee a quilt, years earlier, but the offer had been rejected since quilts at that time were out of style. Maggie’s appreciation of the quilts has been long and consistent and will remain so.

What do the quilts symbolize?

The quilts are pieces of living history, documents in fabric that chronicle the lives of the various generations and the trials, such as war and poverty, that they faced. The quilts serve as a testament to a family’s history of pride and struggle.

What is Dee’s new name?

Dee tells her mother that she has changed her name to Wangero Leewanika Kemanjo to protest being named after the people who have oppressed her.

Why didn’t mama give Dee the quilts?

Mama, the narrator, ultimately gives the family quilts to Maggie instead of Dee (Wangero) because she recognizes that Dee gets everything she wants, that she’s even already claimed the quilts as her own, because they were promised to Maggie, and because Maggie is the daughter who wants them for the right reasons.

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Why does Dee want the quilts so bad?

Dee wants the quilts to display them in her home as symbols of this greater heritage and as symbols of that which defined her ancestor’s humanity before captivity dehumanized them. Neither Dee nor her mother are right or wrong since Dee’s mother’s sense of ancestry extends only to her valued and cherished memories.

What does the quilt symbolize in my mother pieced quilts?

In her poem Teresa Acosta displays the quilt as a symbol for the mother’s love. The narrator is reminiscing over the choices her mother made on the material to use on the quilt, one being the “somber black silk [she] wore to grandmother’s funeral” (38).

Why are the quilts valuable to Dee?

The family quilts have become valuable to Dee only because she wishes to gather some artifacts from her former home. It has now become fashionable for her to have things on display that relate to African heritage, so she has become interested in cultural history.

Why does the narrator refuse to give Dee the quilts she wants?

She knows that Dee doesn’t want the quilts to remember her grandmother. She realizes that she has been neglecting Maggie. She is tired of being pushed around by Dee.

What do the quilts mean to Dee?

To Dee, the quilt is nothing more than a piece of art: something that would look nice in her new place. … The quilt becomes a “bone of contention” when Dee insists that she should have it. At the same time, however, she does not want it because of the loving family hands that have toiled over it.

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What does Dee not understand?

Dee feels that Mama and Maggie do not understand their heritage. She makes this claim because Maggie and Mama do not believe as she does. Dee embraces the idea of changing her name and viewing as art those objects that her ancestors made such as the butter dish and the quilts.

How has Dee changed since she last saw her mother and sister?

She seems very interested, now, in her racial heritage; she has changed her name to a much more African-sounding one — Wangero Leewanika Kemanjo — because she claims that she wants to distance herself from the whites who have oppressed her.